P0113 Code: Intake Air Temperature Sensor 1 Circuit High Input

what does the code p0112 is? in suzuki 

how to daignose error code p0112 in suzuki 

what is the common symption of this code p0112 in suzuki 

what is an intake air tamperature (IAT)sensor 

How to reset the code p0112

  1. What Does the P0113 Code Mean?

    code P0113 stands for “Intake Air Temperature (IAT) Sensor Circuit High Input.” If your OBD-II scanner reports this code, it means your car’s computer has obsorev that there’s a problem with the IAT sensor 1 or its circuit.

    A working IAT sensor sends its readings to the PCM.  the computer adjusts the fuel injector and other components that control the internal combustion chamber. Accurate readings help the engine burn fuel efficiently.

    When the PCM gets a signal voltage reading above the maximum value, it realizes that the IAT sensor circuit has malfunctioned, either because the sensor is unplugged, the terminals are damaged, one of the sensor wires has been cut, or some other open circuit issue. The computer knows -40 is not the correct reading, so it switches on the Check Engine Light and logs the error code P0113.

    If your OBD-II scanner reports this code, it means your car’s computer has determined that there’s a problem with the IAT sensor 1 or its circuit.

  2. What is an Intake Air Temperature (IAT) Sensor and How Can It Cause P0113?

    The Intake Air Temperature (IAT) sensor isn’t present on all engines, thus the P0113 code isn’t on some vehicle code lists; some platforms use the Mass Airflow (MAF) sensor to measure incoming air temperature. But no matter how the air temperature is measured, the ECM/PCM needs to know the temperature of the incoming air because cold air has more oxygen molecules per cubic centimeter of air than hot air, and that difference must be factored in for proper air fuel mixture.

    .you can seen in pics           IAT sensor                                                                MAF sensor                              

     

     

  3. The IAT sensor is a two-wire sensor with a negative temperature coefficient resistor positioned so that it reads the air entering the engine.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

     

    One of the two wires receives about 4.6 volts from the ECM/PCM and the other wire is a reference ground, also from the ECM/PCM. The reason it’s slightly less than the 5 volts delivered to three wire sensors is that there is a resistor inside the ECM/PCM on each two-wire sensor feed. Because the sensing resistor is negative temperature coefficient, the resistance of the sensor is reduced as it gets warmer. As the resistance goes down, so does the voltage measured at the ECM/PCM. Lower voltage means hotter air.

    If the sensor is disconnected or if a wire is chewed or cut leading to the sensor, the voltage registered by the ECM/PCM tops out at 4.6 volts, which is equal to -40 degrees (-40 Fahrenheit is exactly the same as -40 Celsius). This is what you’ll see on the basic OBD2 generic scan tool live datastream. But depending on the manufacturer, the OEM Enhanced datastream can show an entirely different temperature. More about that in a minute.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

     

    How to Test the IAT Sensor

    You have to be able to access the sensor first.With the sensor disconnected and the key switched on (engine off), measure the voltage at the sensor – be careful not to damage the terminals. You should see 4.6 volts with the sensor disconnected. If you do, use a digital volt-ohmmeter to measure sensor resistance at the sensor itself (key on or off, it doesn’t matter). If the sensor is wide open (no continuity in any range), the sensor is bad.

    With the sensor disconnected and the key switched on (engine off), measure the voltage at the sensor – be careful not to damage the terminals.

    If you don’t get the 4.6 volts, there could be a wiring problem – do a visual inspection and if you don’t see anything, hire a mechanic to find and fix the problem.

    How to Diagnose the P0113 Code

    Finding the root cause of an OBD-II trouble code can be difficult as there are a lot of factors to take into account, as well as several possible causes. The engine code P0113 alone has a handful of possible culprits, as listed above.

    The video below can help you get an idea of how to troubleshoot this particular code:

    How to Fix the P0113 Code

    Because OBD-II codes have several possible causes, there’s no one way to fix a specific code. With each possible cause comes specific solutions and fixes, which is why it’s essential to diagnose OBD-II codes correctly and find out the exact cause before attempting any repairs.

    if you have kowledge about that you can attempt to fix this code otherwise bring the vehicle to the nearest auto repair shop and get a trained professional to replace the ailing IAT sensor.

    If you do decide to tackle the P0113 fix yourself, keep in mind that different types of vehicles may require their own distinct solutions—so always check the owner’s manual and consult the factory repair information for your application.

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